Massage & Bodywork

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

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A B M P m e m b e r s e a r n F R E E C E a t w w w. a b m p . c o m / c e b y r e a d i n g M a s s a g e & B o d y w o r k m a g a z i n e 59 How to Give it to Them Not only are millennials experts at electronic browsing and comparison shopping, they also expect complete transparency. Encourage your customers to post reviews of your massage business on sites like Yelp, Google, and TripAdvisor, because those ratings will mean more to millennials than any ad you place. Next, build a Facebook page and keep it filled with fresh content and photos, because nothing drives away business like a page that hasn't been updated in months. Twitter is a great way to broadcast short announcements about new services and special events, and photo-savvy users can gain customers by taking advantage of Instagram's marketing possibilities. Also, remember that your clients might turn out to be your best advertisement. Millennials are the selfie generation, and they love to take and share photos of themselves doing interesting things in interesting places. Set up a stylish and branded photo background in your waiting room or one of your treatment rooms, then announce a monthly prize drawing for those who shared their photos online. 7 INVITE THEM TO THE PARTY What They Want Millennials are somewhat wary of companies with traditional (a.k.a. "old school") business models, and tend to feel uncomfortable doing business out of their digital element. When they do engage in face-to-face communication, they want to feel like part of the group instead of a fifth wheel. How to Give it to Them The downside of growing up with digital communication is that many millennials lack real-life social skills and seem standoffish to those outside their subculture. However, a poll conducted by Benenson Strategy Group showed that more than half of millennials consider one of their parents to be their best friend, and this knowledge-thirsty generation also seeks out and appreciates relationships with anyone who can act as a mentor or advisor. 4 Incorporating familiar technology and social practices into your massage business's daily routine will help millennials feel like they belong, and most will be truly interested in learning how massage can improve their overall health if the information comes to them in a friendly, casual format. Consider an after- hours open house with drinks, snacks, and free mini-massages as a way to show your acceptance of this burgeoning client base. Once your millennial customers discover that you speak their language, they'll be hitting the "Like" button in no time. Notes 1. Derrick Feldmann et al., The Millennial Impact Project, "2015 Millennial Impact Report," 2015, http://achievemulti.wpengine.com/mi/ files/2015/07/2015-MillennialImpactReport.pdf. 2. Morley Winograd and Michael Hais, Governance Studies at Brookings, "How Millennials Could Upend Wall Street and Corporate America," May 2014, www.brookings.edu/wp-content/ uploads/2016/06/Brookings_Winogradfinal.pdf. 3. The Halo Group, "How Can Your Brand Resonate With Millennial Foodies?," accessed November 2017, www.thehalogroup.com/ can-brand-resonate-millennial-foodies. 4. Benenson Strategy Group, "January 2015 Survey of Millennials," 2015, https://fusiondotnet.files. wordpress.com/2015/02/parents.pdf. Lynn Parentini, LMT, CPT, LE, LC, is an author, speaker, and creative strategist specializing in concept development for the wellness, skin, and spa industry. She is the author of The Joy of Healthy Skin (Simon & Schuster, Prentice Hall, 1995) and Stone Journey (Esthetic Alternatives, 2000), and a member of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and a certified facilitator volunteer for the American Cancer Society's "Look Good Feel Better" program. Reach her at lparentini@ymail.com.

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