Massage & Bodywork

SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2017

Issue link: http://www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/867515

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 47 of 119

A B M P m e m b e r s e a r n F R E E C E a t w w w. a b m p . c o m / c e b y r e a d i n g M a s s a g e & B o d y w o r k m a g a z i n e 45 The longus colli is a deep cervical muscle located on the anterior surface of the vertebral column, deep to the thyroid, trachea, and esophagus. This relatively flat muscle spans the anterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies between the atlas (C1) and third thoracic vertebra. The deepest of the anterior neck muscles, the longus colli is long and primarily vertical with multiple segments. The superior oblique portion originates on the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of C3–5, ascends obliquely and medially, and narrows to insert onto the anterior arch of the atlas. A middle vertical portion originates on the anterior bodies of C5–T3, ascends vertically, and inserts on the anterior bodies of C2–4. A third inferior oblique portion originates on the anterior bodies of T1–3, ascends obliquely and laterally, then inserts on the anterior tubercles of C5–6. Together, these segments create an interconnecting network between the anterior surfaces of the cervical and upper thoracic vertebrae. The longus colli is a strong flexor of the head and neck when both sides fire, as it spans all of the cervical vertebrae and is segmented. It is often associated with the rectus capitis anterior and rectus capitis lateralis as the paravertebral group. This group helps stabilize the anterior neck during high-intensity activities like sneezing and rapid arm movements like throwing. It also actively stabilizes the front of the curve of the neck— counteracting the lordotic curvature of the cervical spine due to the weight of the head—and keeps the head from falling back. Longus colli is clearly divided into right and left sides with a gap at the midline of the vertebral bodies. This creates some leverage for lateral flexion. Oblique fiber orientation in its superior and inferior segments generates slight rotation to the opposite side when longus colli fires unilaterally. FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY education LONGUS COLLI Attachments • Origin: Anterior tubercles of transverse processes of C3–5 and anterior surface of bodies of C5–T3 • Insertion: Anterior arch of atlas (C1), anterior bodies of C2–4, and anterior tubercles of transverse processes C5–6 Actions • Flexes the head and neck (bilateral action) • Laterally flexes the head and neck (unilateral action) • Rotates the head and neck toward same side (unilateral action) Innervation • Cervical spinal nerves 2–7 Longus Colli By Christy Cael

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Massage & Bodywork - SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2017