Massage & Bodywork

January/February 2011

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TEN FOR TODAY "We can take a tight, rigid muscle and soften it immediately by dredging it with a vacuum," she says. "It's a very strong therapy, so we want to go slowly with people." 6. FOR REAL LUXURY, CONSIDER LULUR Some high-end spas have taken this elaborate Indonesian ritual (lulur) and turned it into the height of exotic pampering for clients. Ancient Javanese princesses followed a 40-day lulur ritual before marriage. Today, a lulur massage begins with a scented oil massage along with acupressure, then a warm yogurt massage, then an exhilarating shower followed by a warm bubble bath, then more massage. POSE ANY DANGERS? Of course they may, just as many massage techniques might, if practiced by an untrained or insuffi ciently trained therapist. Capellini advises caution, 7. especially when dealing with therapies that involve heat. Shannon warns that cupping can leave the skin discolored, and nothing will invalidate your liability coverage faster than attempting traditional fi re cupping. "Just don't use stuff you don't know anything about," Capellini says. "It's a good idea to be aware of as much about a product or technique as you can be." DO THESE EXOTIC THERAPIES EASTERN TECHNIQUES IS IN THE EAST Sure, there are massage conventions and trade shows where you can get a taste of a technique. And if you like something, you can take weekend classes, then enroll in longer programs if you fi nd something that really appeals to you. But to really experience an Asian therapy at its most authentic, many experts believe you need to leave the Western hemisphere. "Do some exploratory work to see 8. if you like it before going overseas," Capellini suggests. "But most people I know have a great experience when they go East. There's no substitute for that state of mind. In Asia, they have a giving, service-oriented humility that a lot of us could benefi t from incorporating into what we do." JUST DOESN'T RESONATE WITH ME" The work may not appeal to your Western clients. And that's OK. "Embrace ambiguity," Schupack 9. advises. "Not all concepts will work for all people all the time. Take what you like and leave the rest. "Come across an idea that sounds benefi cial?" she asks. "Integrate it into your practice. Begin one step at a time." THESE DIFFERENT FORMS OF THERAPY Indeed, you could fi ll a textbook with all the different forms of Eastern therapy and their variations. Visit ABMP.com for a 10. comprehensive list of more than 260 modalities acknowledged by Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals, including Asian bodywork. You can I NEED A MENU LISTING ALL "BUT EASTERN PHILOSOPHY also turn to the American Organization for Bodywork Therapies of Asia (www. aobta.org); it recognizes 17 defi ned forms of Asian bodywork, including acupressure, amma, chi nei tsang, fi ve-element shiatsu, integrative eclectic shiatsu, jin shin do, macrobiotic shiatsu, shiatsu, traditional Thai bodywork, tui na, and Zen shiatsu. based freelance writer. Contact her at killarneyrose@comcast.net. Rebecca Jones is a Denver- THE BEST PLACE TO LEARN earn CE hours at your convenience: abmp's online education center, www.abmp.com 83

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