Massage & Bodywork

MAY | JUNE 2016

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C h e c k o u t A B M P 's l a t e s t n e w s a n d b l o g p o s t s . Av a i l a b l e a t w w w. a b m p . c o m . 87 better whenever she wants, both in this moment and in the rest of her life. That perpetual applicability of the effortless breath is important, because the one thing we know with certainty is the massage session will soon be over. Though it is gratifying when a client tells you she wants to stay on your table forever, we should want our massage work to prepare the client to re-enter the world of the standing and to be able to navigate that world more easily. I believe engaging the client's breath—and making her conscious of the possibilities within that breath—is one of the most concrete and useful means we have to prepare her for the post-massage world. When the client walks out of the room and feels her breath full and easy—even as life's stresses re-emerge, even with our hands no longer on her—she is empowered. The beauty of massaging with the breath is that we can't not breathe. Unlike the daily stretching routine we never make time for, or our attempts at a new workout regimen, or the fitness tracker we keep leaving at home, breathing is something we already do, all the time. Growing our awareness of it gives us the chance to live with a little less effort, to embody our bodies with a little more ease. The breath is our perpetual possibility. With every new exhalation we have the chance to become more aware. To notice exactly what we are doing right now, just at this moment, and just as important, to notice all that we don't need to be doing right now. Notes 1. Paul Ingraham, PainScience.com, "The Respiration Connection: How Dysfunctional Breathing Might Be a Root Cause of a Variety of Common Upper Body Pain Problems and Injuries," accessed March 2016, www. painscience.com/articles/respiration-connection.php. 2. Fiona Rattray and Linda Ludwig, Clinical Massage Therapy: Understanding, Assessing and Treating Over 70 Conditions (Toronto: Talus Incorporated, 2000): 34; Leslie Kaminoff and Amy Matthews, Yoga Anatomy, 2nd ed. (Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2012): 16; Paul Ingraham, "The Respiration Connection." 3. Frank Netter, Atlas of Human Anatomy, 3rd ed. (New York: ICON Learning Systems, 2002): 191. 4. Fiona Rattray and Linda Ludwig, Clinical Massage Therapy: Understanding, Assessing and Treating Over 70 Conditions, 33. 5. Paul Ingraham, "The Respiration Connection." 6. Anatomy Trains, "Fascial Release Technique Webinar: Part II, Opening the Breath and Shoulders," accessed March 2016, www.anatomytrains.com/ product/fascial-release-technique-videos/. 7. James P. Fisher, Colin N. Young, and Paul J. Fadel, "Central Sympathetic Overactivity: Maladies and Mechanisms," Autonomic Neuroscience 148, no. 1–2 (June 2009): 5–15. 8. Leslie Kaminoff and Amy Matthews, Yoga Anatomy, 3. 9. Ibid, 6. 10. Ibid, 20. David M. Lobenstine, LMT, is owner of Full Breath Massage in New York City. He combines an attention to the breath, along with deep tissue and myofascial work, to help clients inhabit their body anew. He also teaches continuing education classes to help LMTs engage with their breath and their clients' breath. Find him at davidlobenstine@ gmail.com and www.fullbreathmassage.com. The beauty of massaging with the breath is that we can't not breathe. (800) 409-0995 www.AncientHealingOils.com All Orders over $60 use the Discount code MB16 and receive a 16% discount and FREE Shipping (domestic orders only) orders over $35 receive Free Shipping www.GoAHO.com Ancient Healing Oils is known the world over for High Quality and Super Customer Service.

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