Massage & Bodywork

MARCH | APRIL 2016

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104 m a s s a g e & b o d y w o r k m a r c h / a p r i l 2 0 1 6 technique ENERGY WORK Sharing Your Beliefs Are There Invisible Helpers? And What Are You Supposed to Do About It? By Cyndi Dale applied to healers who rebalance information and vibration to further health—must have a sense of their own beliefs in this matter. This inner comfort will help you confidently deal with this topic with clients, should it come up. A COMPENDIUM OF SPIRITS First, let's look at how many people profess a belief in intangible aid. There are thousands of categories outlining invisible helpers. For our purposes, I'm going to concentrate on three main kinds: God or a universal spirit, angels, and the deceased. I'm not going to analyze the effectiveness of these potential sources of power. Instead, I'll explore the numbers of Americans who believe they have an unseen support system. This knowledge is a clue as to how you might proceed if the theme enters a client session. I don't think you'd be surprised to find out the majority of Americans believe in God or a universal spirit. According to a 2011 Gallup poll, more than 90 percent of Americans say they believe one or the other exists. 1 Many people adhere to a religious practice; however, one in 10 Americans don't identify their beliefs with Whether we call them spirit guides, guardian angels, the deceased, or God, most professional schools of healing don't talk about "invisible helpers." The healer interested in embracing subtle energy concepts and protocol, however, must sooner or later ask the question: Do I believe there are invisible helpers? This question is a bit like a magician's scarf. You tug it out of the hat and dozens of silk scarves follow, all tied together. Participate in a conversation about subtle assistants and you'll start thinking about other questions. Does my client think there is intangible help? Does my client want me to bring up the topic? What do I do if my client poses the subject? And the scariest question of all: Do I actually bring up this topic? Through this column, I invite you to step boldly across the threshold labeled "This Isn't a Professional Topic" and into the arena of the invisible. My goal is to enable a conversation between you and yourself. It's a subject you might have already considered— or not. Either way, all energy workers—the term

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