Massage & Bodywork

SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2022

Issue link: http://www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1476304

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 42 of 108

For many decades, and for most Western medicine professionals, fascia was primarily considered an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our muscles and other organs. Yes, there were some early histological reports about the presence of sensory nerves in fascia, but these were largely disregarded and did not affect the prevailing medical understanding of musculoskeletal dynamics. 1 While Moshe Feldenkrais and Ida Rolf were apparently not aware of the intriguing importance of fascia as a sensory organ for our body perception, Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, wrote that, "No doubt nerves exist in the fascia . . ." and suggested all fascial tissues should be treated with the same respect as if dealing with "the branch offices of the brain." 2 THE FASCIAL NETWORK Our Richest Sensory Organ By Robert Schleip KEY POINTS • The estimated number of nerve endings in the body-wide fascial system is 250 million. Compared with the estimated 200 million nerve endings in the skin, this suggests the human fascial network constitutes, in fact, our richest sensory organ. • Research shows that emotional stress may exert signifi cant infl uences on the expression of myofascial pain. By Robert Schleip Our Richest Sensory Organ By Robert Schleip NETWORK Our Richest Sensory Organ By Robert Schleip THE FASCIAL NETWORK Our Richest Sensory Organ an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our muscles and other organs. Yes, there were some early histological reports about the presence of sensory nerves in fascia, but these were largely disregarded and did not affect the prevailing For many decades, and for most Western medicine professionals, fascia was primarily considered an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our muscles and other organs. Yes, there were some early histological reports about the presence of sensory nerves in fascia, but these were largely disregarded and did not affect the prevailing medical understanding of 1 While were apparently not aware of the intriguing importance of fascia as a sensory organ for our body perception, Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, wrote that, "No doubt nerves exist in the musculoskeletal dynamics. Moshe Feldenkrais and Ida Rolf were apparently not aware of the intriguing importance of fascia as a sensory organ for our body perception, Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, wrote that, "No doubt nerves exist in the fascia . . ." and suggested all fascial tissues should be treated with the and did not affect the prevailing medical understanding of musculoskeletal dynamics. Moshe Feldenkrais and Ida Rolf were apparently not aware of the intriguing importance of fascia as a sensory organ for our body perception, Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, wrote that, "No doubt nerves exist in the fascia . . ." and suggested all fascial tissues should be treated with the same respect as if dealing with sensory nerves in fascia, but these were largely disregarded and did not affect the prevailing medical understanding of musculoskeletal dynamics. Moshe Feldenkrais and Ida Rolf were apparently not aware of the intriguing importance of fascia as a sensory organ for our body perception, Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, wrote that, "No doubt nerves exist in the fascia . . ." and suggested all fascial tissues should be treated with the same respect as if dealing with "the branch offices of the brain." THE FASCIAL NETWORK For many decades, and for most Western medicine professionals, fascia was primarily considered an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our Our Richest Sensory Organ For many decades, and for most Western medicine professionals, fascia was primarily considered Our Richest Sensory Organ For many decades, and for most Western medicine professionals, fascia was primarily considered an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our THE FASCIAL NETWORK Our Richest Sensory Organ THE FASCIAL THE FASCIAL NETWORK THE FASCIAL NETWORK • The estimated number of nerve endings in the body-wide fascial system is 250 million. Compared with the estimated 200 million nerve endings in the skin, this suggests the human fascial network constitutes, in fact, our richest sensory organ. • Research shows that emotional stress may exert signifi cant infl uences on the expression of myofascial pain. • The estimated number of nerve endings in the body-wide fascial system is 250 million. Compared with the estimated 200 million nerve endings in the skin, this suggests the human fascial network constitutes, in fact, our richest sensory organ. • Research shows that emotional stress may exert signifi cant infl uences on the expression of fascial system is 250 million. Compared with the estimated 200 million nerve endings in the skin, this suggests the human fascial network constitutes, in fact, our richest sensory organ. • Research shows that emotional 200 million nerve endings in the skin, this suggests the human fascial network constitutes, in fact, our richest THE FASCIAL NETWORK KEY POINTS • The estimated number of nerve endings in the body-wide fascial system is 250 million. Compared with the estimated 200 million nerve endings in the skin, this suggests the human fascial network constitutes, in fact, our richest sensory organ. • Research shows that emotional For many decades, and for most Western medicine professionals, fascia was primarily considered an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our muscles and other organs. Yes, there were some early histological reports about the presence of fascia was primarily considered an inert wrapping organ, merely giving mechanical support to our muscles and other organs. Yes, there were some early histological reports about the presence of sensory nerves in fascia, but these were largely disregarded

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of Massage & Bodywork - SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2022