Massage & Bodywork

MARCH | APRIL 2021

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no. 3 (July 2020): 127–31, https://doi.org /10.1080/10669817.2020.1766845. 3. Rita Charon, "Narrative Medicine: A Model for Empathy, Reflection, Profession, and Trust," Journal of the American Medical Association 286, no. 15 (October 2001): 1897–1902, https://doi.org10.1001/jama.286.15.1897. 4. Trisha Greenhalgh and Brian Hurwitz, "Why Study Narrative?" British Medical Journal 318, no. 7175 (January 1999): 48–50, https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.318.7175.48. 5. Mauro Fornari, Luca Carnevali, and Andrea Sgoifo, "Single Osteopathic Manipulative Therapy Session Dampens Acute Autonomic and Neuroendocrine Responses to Mental Stress in Healthy Male Participants," Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 117, no. 9 (September 2017): 559–67, https://doi. org/10.7556/jaoa.2017.110; Charles E. Henley et al., "Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment and Its Relationship to Autonomic Nervous System Activity as Demonstrated by Heart Rate Variability: A Repeated Measures Study," Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care 2, no. 7 (June 2008): 1–8, https://doi.org/10.1186/1750- 4732-2-7; Aaron T. Henderson et al., "Effects of Rib Raising on the Autonomic Nervous System: A Pilot Study Using Noninvasive Biomarkers," Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 110, no. 6 (June 2010): 324–30. 6. Julet Baltonado and Tyler Cymet, "Can the Humanities Humanize Health Care?" Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 117, no. 4 (April 2017): 273–75, https://doi.org/10.7556/ jaoa.2017.046; Patricia Sexton, "Maintaining Balance in Medical School through Medical Humanities Electives," Missouri Medicine 115, no. 1 (January/February 2018): 35–36; Craig M. Klugman, "Medical Humanities Teaching in North American Allopathic and Osteopathic Medical Schools," Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (November 2017): 473–81, https://doi. org/10.1007/s10912-017-9491-z; Gary Hoff et al., "A Call to Include Medical Humanities in the Curriculum of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and in Applicant Selection," Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 114, no. 10 (October 2014): 798–804, https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2014.154. 7. See the Gold Foundation databases on humanism in health care at www.gold- foundation.org/resources/#databases. 8. Rita Charon et al., The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017). 9. René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy, 4th ed., trans. Donald A. Cress (Indianapolis: Hackett, 1998), 18–9. 10. Elizabeth Grosz, Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994), 6. 11. Rita Charon et al., The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine, 80–81. 12. Drew Leder, "Tale of Two Bodies: The Cartesian Corpse and the Lived Body," in The Body in Medical Thought and Practice, ed. Drew Leder (Boston: Kluwer, 1992), 19; Peter Finkelstein, "Studies in the Anatomy Laboratory: A Portrait of Individual and Collective Defense," in Inside Doctoring: Stages and Outcomes in the Professional Development of Physicians, eds. R. H. Coombs, D. Scott May, and Gary W. Small (New York: Praeger, 1986), 22–42. 13. Elizabeth Grosz, Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism, 6. 14. Rita Charon et al., The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine, 114–15. 15. Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics (New York: Oxford, 1979); National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, The Belmont Report, No. 78-0012 (Washington DC: US Printing Office, 1978). 16. Carol M. Davis, "Affective Education for the Health Professions: Facilitating Appropriate Behavior," Physical Therapy 61, no. 11 (November 1981): 1587–93, https://doi.org/10.1093/ptj/61.11.1587. 17. Rita Charon et al., The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine, 119. 18. Rita Charon et al., The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine, 120–21. 19. Rita Charon et al., The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine, 129. 20. Trisha Greenhalgh, How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-Based Medicine and Healthcare, 6th ed. (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2019), 1. 21. Maria Giulia Marini, Narrative Medicine: Bridging the Gap between Evidence- Based Care and Medical Humanities (Switzerland: Springer, 2016), 2. 22. Sasha Chaitow, "Whose Research is it Anyway?" Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies 23, no. 3 (July 2019): 435–38, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2019.08.002. 23. Trisha Greenhalgh How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-Based Medicine and Healthcare, 6th ed., 4. 24. Trisha Greenhalgh, GP, is a professor of Primary Care Health Sciences, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford, UK. 25. Trisha Greenhalgh, How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-Based Medicine and Healthcare, 6th ed., 235–36. 26. Trisha Greenhalgh, "Is Evidence-Based Medicine Broken?" Project Syndicate, October 8, 2014, accessed January 15, 2021, www.project- syndicate.org/commentary/is-evidence-based- medicine-broken-by-trish-greenhalgh-2014-10. With 20 years in teaching and over a decade in journalism and academic publishing, Sasha Chaitow, PhD, is series editor for Elsevier'sªLeon Chaitow Library of Bodywork and Movement Therapies‹and former managing editor of the Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies. Based between the UK and Greece, she teaches research literacy and science reporting at the University of Patras, Greece. She is also a professional artist, gallerist, and educator who exhibits and teaches internationally. L i s te n to T h e A B M P Po d c a s t a t a b m p.co m /p o d c a s t s o r w h e reve r yo u a cce s s yo u r favo r i te p o d c a s t s 49 SOMATIC RESE ARCH

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