Massage & Bodywork

JULY | AUGUST 2019

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technique ENERGY WORK 102 m a s s a g e & b o d y w o r k j u l y / a u g u s t 2 0 1 9 Ancient Principles Applied to a Modern World By Cyndi Dale SOUL REPAIR Soul repair recognizes that a soul can become injured but can also be restored. This statement applies to wounds incurred in this lifetime but also those carried in from prior existences. Basically, asserts a shaman, when a soul is in a body, everything that happens is imprinted within it. When the soul exits at death, it gathers the echoes and imprints of that particular lifetime and brings them into the great beyond, only to transfer these memories into the next new body; the cycle then starts all over again. Good and loving remembrances are recorded, but negative events and dysfunctional beliefs seem to dominate. Shamans believe that to help a person heal a physical or psychological problem in the here and now, they have to look inside the soul to perceive the causative damage from this or previous existences. Ultimately, No matter your healing style, you can better serve your client by understanding and employing a few of the concepts involved in soul healing. As I shared in my last article ("Soul Healing," May/ June 2019, page 98), every healing modality is rooted in shamanism. Shamans believe that a client's soul has experienced several incarnations leading to their current one, lingering in ethereal domains between lifetimes. To truly benefit a client, says a shaman, it's vital to assess their soul. Part of that comes from an assessment of the soul's karma and dharma, but there are other steps a shaman often employs. they are looking for a spiritual malady, something making the soul believe it's separate from the Divine. In the modern world, soul repair is still a spiritual endeavor, but you don't need to sound spiritual, New Age, or religious to perform it. Everyone has suffered from feeling separated: abandoned by a parent, rejected by a friend, too different to be acceptable. Many shamans—and even a good number of therapists—believe all illnesses, pains, emotional disorders, and the inability to recover from trauma come from believing oneself to be detached from a necessary source of kindness and compassion. By offering a client empathy and care, you assist them in healing their soul. You connect with them and better enable them to connect with their own sense of a Higher Power.

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