Massage & Bodywork

MAY | JUNE 2019

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Ta k e 5 a n d t r y A B M P F i v e - M i n u t e M u s c l e s a t w w w. a b m p . c o m / f i v e - m i n u t e - m u s c l e s . 57 Ta k e 5 a n d t r y A B M P F i v e - M i n u t e M u s c l e s a t w w w. a b m p . c o m / f i v e - m i n u t e - m u s c l e s . 57 W e want to learn so we can feel "expert." We want to learn so we can use lingo and cite statistics that will make us more effective, put our clients at ease, and maybe even make them sit back, impressed, and say, "Wow! How did you know that?" This is really, really normal and human. If this is how you go about things, you're in very good company. Humans are hardwired to want to know more stuff. When we know more stuff, we feel in control. Massage therapists clamber after continuing education (CE) hours that promise "certification" after eight hours or 16 hours, unfazed by the absence of clinical, supervised practice or the other hallmarks of Curiosity and Real Listening are the Gateways to Deep Inquiry and Discovery with Clients true competency. We invest in courses that will give us permission to add capital letters after our names and that will empower us to tell clients what's wrong with them and that the days of it being wrong are over! Lest you be convinced that I hate learning or even CE hours specifically, let me tell you that I am a big fan of learning, of experiences, of anything that creates the opportunity for me to be more "useful" and to live a more meaningful and connected life. Like so many things in this human life, it boils down to expectations and intent. It's a venerable thing to pursue knowledge and skill, but most of us are really pursuing certainty. What most of us want is to be When you sign up for a class called "Oncology Massage 101" or "Massage Therapy for Transgendered Clients" or "NMT for Pelvic Dysfunction," your true inspiration may be somewhat about people affected by cancer, transgendered people, or people with hip pain, but I want to talk about how a large part of what leads us to learn is our desire to lessen the number of times we "get it wrong."

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