Massage & Bodywork

March/April 2013

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best practices busIness sIDe | Q & art | table lessons | savvy self-Care good riddance, gluten By Linda Knittel only a few short years ago, gluten became a household word. Before that, it was mainly the concern of those individuals with full-blown celiac disease, an immune reaction to gluten that causes damage to the inner surface of the small intestine and an inability to absorb certain nutrients. Different categories of gluten-free flour include those from nuts or seeds. (almond flour pictured here) These days, the term gluten-free is plastered everywhere, from store shelves to restaurant menus, and it's clear why. According to the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research, gluten intolerance, a related but less severe condition marked by symptoms such as depression, diarrhea, fatigue, "foggy mind," and joint pain, affects approximately 18 million people, or 6 percent of the population.1 Add to that a host of people who are minimizing or eliminating gluten just because it makes them feel healthier, and you've got a whole lot of people wanting good-tasting, gluten-free foods—especially baked goods. But just because a food is devoid of gluten doesn't mean it's healthy. A vast array of seemingly healthful foods has emerged that may be "glutenfree," but is often full of sugar, saturated oils, and other questionable ingredients. While you can certainly fi nd quality, prepackaged gluten-free treats, making them at home is a great option, too. With a few tips, you'll be baking gluten-free versions of everything from muffi ns to cake. MiX it uP Premixed gluten-free flours are a wonderful shortcut for the beginner. With all-purpose mixes, you can make most recipes gluten-free by measuring the flour one-for-one and the recipe will still work. Then, once you've gotten a little experience under your belt, you can experiment with the different categories of flours. Some are made from grains (amaranth, millet, rice, www.abmp.com. See what benefits await you. 39

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