Massage & Bodywork

SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2018

Issue link: http://www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1013756

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 35 of 122

A B M P m e m b e r s e a r n F R E E C E a t w w w. a b m p . c o m / c e b y r e a d i n g M a s s a g e & B o d y w o r k m a g a z i n e 33 TABLE LESSONS best practices Simple Things First Soft-Tissue Sources of Discomfort Are Often Overlooked By Douglas Nelson "Very few," she replied. "Just two or three episodes since the last session." This was great news. Three months previous, this client had presented with a host of strange neurological symptoms that were perplexing both her and her doctor. None of her physicians had a clear idea as to the genesis of her symptoms or what the appropriate response might be. Hearing her report, my mind immediately reverted to another client (Ms. B.) who, three years earlier, also presented with unusual neurological symptoms. An otherwise healthy woman in her mid-40s, Ms. B. was referred to me by her primary care physician, who was at a loss to explain her strange neurological symptoms. Ms. B. described having "sensations on the left side of her face" in the mandibular and maxillary areas. Multiple doctors explored possible diagnoses, from tumors to serious neurological diseases. Perplexing to everyone, these facial sensations were unaccompanied by any other symptoms. Neurological diseases are progressive, but her symptoms were contained to her face and were relatively unchanged in frequency and intensity. Activity and stress seemed to exacerbate her symptoms, but the location remained unchanged. What was changing was Ms. B.'s emotional and financial health; both were deteriorating in direct relationship to the number of additional tests, providers, and unanswered questions about her future. The long list of providers, plus additional out-of-pocket complementary providers, had depleted her family's financial resources. Ms. B. was both emotionally and financially exhausted. REMEMBER OUR BREAD AND BUTTER The human brain is wired to want a reason for each experience we encounter. When a reason is ascertained, then a course of action can be pursued. Having no reasonable explanation for one's symptoms is a completely disempowering experience. While Ms. B. wanted

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Massage & Bodywork - SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2018